Harvest Festival celebrates the Town of Sweden’s farming roots

By on September 24, 2018
The steam engine on the right has an original sign “NOVO Engines and Outfits” with the date 1925. At the left is a pump with its sign “United Engine Co.” stating it can be rented for $49.88 a month. It dates to 1914. Scott Salmon, left, said, “They used to use it to pump out basements.” His partner is Donald Rosario.

The steam engine on the right has an original sign “NOVO Engines and Outfits” with the date 1925. At the left is a pump with its sign “United Engine Co.” stating it can be rented for $49.88 a month. It dates to 1914. Scott Salmon, left, said, “They used to use it to pump out basements.” His partner is Donald Rosario.

On Saturday, September 15, the Town of Sweden’s annual Harvest Fest was held at the Sweden Farmers Museum on Lake Road South. On a warm breezy day, the event provided demonstrations, displays, arts, vendors, bake sales, and hay ride tours of the nearby cemetery.

“We celebrated our community’s farming roots,” Marion Dilger said, as a member of the organizing committee. She further praised “all the hard work that volunteers have put into the museum’s house and barn to preserve that tradition.”

Sweden Town Supervisor Kevin G. Johnson attended the festival. “Agriculture has been and will continue to be a cornerstone of life in Sweden,” he said. “I commend Christine Hunt and the rest of the Sweden Farmers Museum Committee for hosting activities like this throughout the year.”

The volunteers who worked on planning and running the festival were: Marion Dilger, Kathy Goetz, Don Grentzinger, Christine Hunt, Lori Skoog, Susan Smith, and Jim Weinkauf.

This photo essay by Dianne Hickerson gives a sampling of the variety of rich offerings at the event.

Marion Dilger used her antique spinning wheel to demonstrate how fibers are spun into yarn.

Marion Dilger used her antique spinning wheel to demonstrate how fibers are spun into yarn.

Kevin G. Johnson, Sweden Town Supervisor, and his children Reagan, Grant, Kevie and Maggie, enjoyed learning from Marion Dilger how cotton was spun into yarn.

Kevin G. Johnson, Sweden Town Supervisor, and his children Reagan, Grant, Kevie and Maggie, enjoyed learning from Marion Dilger how cotton was spun into yarn.

Richard Jurzysta operates the “Woodmizer LT35” full hydraulic saw that turns lumber into beams, mantles, and other things. The horizontal band saw moves along a stationary log at a specified thickness.

Richard Jurzysta operates the “Woodmizer LT35” full hydraulic saw that turns lumber into beams, mantles, and other things. The horizontal band saw moves along a stationary log at a specified thickness.

Al Cretney is a well-known woodcarver who specializes in carving birds. He has exhibited his work in craft shows across the United States. “I do it to fill my free time,” he says.

Al Cretney is a well-known woodcarver who specializes in carving birds. He has exhibited his work in craft shows across the United States. “I do it to fill my free time,” he says.

Fred Drungard shapes a wrought iron object to add to his display. A Hilton resident, he says he does this just for shows and not for profit, “That’s for sure.”

Fred Drungard shapes a wrought iron object to add to his display. A Hilton resident, he says he does this just for shows and not for profit, “That’s for sure.”

Leanna Hale, Town of Clarkson historian, wears a dress fashioned from the Civil War era. The day was too hot for her to wear her bloomers, she said.

Leanna Hale, Town of Clarkson historian, wears a dress fashioned from the Civil War era. The day was too hot for her to wear her bloomers, she said.

Mary Eunice Weinkauf demonstrated her quilting skills.

Mary Eunice Weinkauf demonstrated her quilting skills.

Kris Sanger displayed a complete line of handmade alpaca clothing.

Kris Sanger displayed a complete line of handmade alpaca clothing.

A beautiful display of rag rugs was shown by Carol Rizzo

A beautiful display of rag rugs was shown by Carol Rizzo